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Joshua Mann

Category Archives: Scholarship

The ‘Discovery’ of 29 New Homilies on the Psalms Attr. to Origen

The ‘Discovery’ of 29 New Homilies on the Psalms Attr. to Origen

Recently I was participating in an academic conference where one senior scholar mentioned their involvement at a recent colloquium (cf. report) discussing 29 homilies on the Psalms recently (re)discovered and attributed to Origen. At this I noticed a bit of astonishment amongst a few that seemed to indicate this news was not as well known as one would expect since these homilies were discovered in April 2012 and reported within two months. In any case, this prompted me to draw together the following:

First, the manuscript in question can be viewed online, and has been available online at least since shortly after its discovery, but likely longer (I have not found the date it was made available online). Also a critical edition is now published: Lorenzo Perrone (ed.)  Die neuen Psalmenhomilien: Eine kritische Edition des Codex Monacensis Graecus 314 (De Gruyter, 2015) [TOC online]. For a comparison of the homilies in this manuscript compared to what we find in Jerome (Epistle 33) and Rufinus’ Latin, see the chart from Perrone at the bottom of this post.

Some significant dates of the discovery and aftermath with links: Continue Reading

My book picks from Princeton Profs’ Summer Reading

My book picks from Princeton Profs’ Summer Reading

I am always interested in the books that other academics are hoping to read. Recently Princeton released the summer reading that a handful are hoping to tackle this Summer. From those recommendations, I have highlighted the following for my own list: From AnneMarie Luijendijk’s list: Carol Harrison, The Art of Listening in the Early Church… Continue Reading

Reducing Oneself to a Curriculum Vitae (CV)

Reducing Oneself to a Curriculum Vitae (CV)

It recently occurred to me that the academic Curriculum Vitae (CV) is not only an instrument through which a scholar presents the scholarly self to the scholarly world, but also an instrument through which the scholar presents the self to the self. In other words, the CV functions like a (highly skewed) window through which the world can see… Continue Reading

Chad Wellmon on Reading, From Augustine to Digital Humanists

Chad Wellmon on Reading, From Augustine to Digital Humanists

Chad Wellmon, in “Sacred Reading: From Augustine to the Digital Humanists,” recounts various shifts in the conception of reading over the centuries–how we read, for what we read, the telos of reading, etc. Underlying the compelling narrative Wellmon crafts is a comparison of ‘close’ and ‘distant’ (sometimes equated with ‘computational’) reading: Continue Reading

Today’s Degrees Cost More, Worth Less

Today’s Degrees Cost More, Worth Less

A friend of mine shared an article repeating a familiar narrative, namely the plight of freshly minted PhDs looking for work. Today’s academic degrees cost far more than they used to but are worth far less. So who is cashing in on the difference? Related to this, I have deep reservations about the nearly unqualified encouragement given… Continue Reading

Where is a text’s meaning?

Where is a text’s meaning?

A classic hermeneutical question is, Where does meaning lie, in the author, text, or reader? One exercise I have given students when I taught hermeneutics courses a few years ago is a play on the old ‘if a tree falls and no one is around to hear it’: If a book falls open in the middle of a… Continue Reading

The Politics of Time

The Politics of Time

I have just read a really nice article in JSNT by David Horrell and Wei Hsien Wan on the politics of time inherent to the ‘eschatological Christology’ in 1 Peter. In other words, setting up Christ as the centre of time (and the sweep of history) reorients one’s assumed associations of power. Continue Reading